The great sugar debate – bread taken off the “unhealthy” list

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hand and sugar shutterstockThe Federation of Bakers has influenced the turnaround of Action on Sugar’s decision to include bread on their list of unhealthy foods.

Action on Sugar, formed in January this year by a group of leading scientists and academics, have acknowledged that their inclusion of bread in their list of products high in sugar was flawed, particularly as much occurs naturally. A spokesman for the FoB claims that the levels of naturally occurring sugars in foods such as bananas and apples for example puts the sugar content of bread into context. British Baker report that the bakery industry needs to reassure the public that bread is not high in sugar, and that they need to continue to eat bread as part of a healthy balanced diet.

Comments made by the British Society of Baking do bring an element of common sense into this debate, where they claim that part of the alleged obesity crisis is the rise in sedentary lifestyles and over eating in general. They go on to point out that bread has been eaten for many years by consumers without any apparent health or obesity problems.

The total sugars in bread are claimed to be below 4g in 100g, and would be classified as “low sugar”, in comparison to bananas at 20mg per 100g and apples with 11g. The government has been advised by a Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition that sugar intake should be halved to 25g of sugar daily for women, and 35g for men.

The director of the FoB, talking to British Baker points out that carbohydrates should form 50% of dietary energy according to this recent report to the government. This means that it is important for consumers to continue to eat bread as part of a healthy balanced diet.

The BSB sensibly point out that unless consumers take responsibility for what and how much they eat, their health and weight issues will not approve, and no matter what changes are made by bakers to their products, the obesity crisis will continue to be a health issue that is becoming more apparent and challenging.

The Federation of Bakers has influenced the turnaround by Action on Sugar’s decision to include bread on their list of unhealthy foods.

Action on Sugar, formed in January this year by a group of leading scientists and academics, have acknowledged that their inclusion of bread in their list of products high in sugar was flawed, particularly as much occurs naturally. A spokesman for the FoB claims that the levels of naturally occurring sugars in foods such as bananas and apples for example puts the sugar content of bread into context. British Baker report that the bakery industry needs to reassure the public that bread is not high in sugar, and that they need to continue to eat bread as part of a healthy balanced diet.

Comments made by the British Society of Baking do bring an element of common sense into this debate, where they claim that part of the alleged obesity crisis is the rise in sedentary lifestyles, and over eating in general. They go on to point out that bread has been eaten for many years by consumers without any apparent health or obesity problems.

The total sugars in bread, according the the FoB, are below 4g in 100g, and would be classified as “low sugar”, in comparison to bananas at 20mg per 100g and apples with 11g. The government has been advised by a Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition that sugar intake should be halved to 25g of sugar daily for women, and 35g for men.

The director of the FoB, talking to British Baker points out that carbohydrates should form 50% of dietary energy according to this recent report to the government. This means that it is important for consumers to continue to eat bread as part of a healthy balanced diet.

The BSB sensibly point out that unless consumers take responsibility for what and how much they eat, their health and weight issues will not improve, and no matter what changes are made by bakers to their products, the obesity crisis will continue to be a health issue that is becoming more apparent and challenging.

 

 

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